All posts by John Gray

Sunday Class update June

This month we were looking at the work of Fu Bao Shi. The aim was to create one picture from 3 of his Mo GU Works. This required some thought because the pictures had to be meddled together and rescaled to suit the new composition. We had some interesting results – all different.

Fu Bao Shi – Walking in the Mountains

Fu Bao Shi – Waterfall

Fu Bao Shi – Listening to the Spring

Rose Meech

Jean Gray

Bianca Deegan

Sarah Turner

Marion Dearlove

Sunday Class update May

This month we were looking at Magnolias by various artists that we had not used before including Chao Shaoang, Wang Xuetao and a full scroll by an unknown artist who’s work is held by the Metropolitan Museum.

There were both Mo Gu and Lei Gu works and were fun to work with

Wang Xuetao Magnolia Nymph

Chao Shaoan Magnolia

Artist Unknown 3 (1368-1644)

Sarah Turner

Jean Gray

Rose Meech 1

Rose Meech 2

Sunday Class update February

Because it is the year of the dragon – this month we had a look at dragons using works by Jane Dwight (top) and Chen Rong (below

They required a lot of concentration but were fun to paint with some interesting results.

Sarah Turner

Sheila McCormack

Jean Gray

Karen Gowlett

Malcolm Gowlett (2 pictures)

Rose Meech

Marion Dearlove

Sunday Class January Update

No class this month but since we are about to have the year of the dragon, some information about dragons

Year of the Dragon

Chinese New Year 2024 is a Year of the Dragon, more specifically, Wood Dragon. Chinese New Year 2024 will fall on Saturday, February 10th, 2024.

2024 is the Year of the Wood Dragon. Dragon is the 5th animal in the 12-year cycle of the Chinese zodiac signs, coming after the Rabbit and before the Snake. The next Dragon year in 2036 (the Year of the Fire Dragon). Dragons are associated with the earthly branch symbol chen. 

Dragons are powerful, endlessly energetic and full of vitality, goal-oriented yet idealistic and romantic, and a visionary leader. They know exactly who they are and possess the keenest sense of self among the 12 zodiacs of Chinese astrology. 

Dragons present themselves as magnificent yet benevolent rulers who’re confident, generous, idealistic, and ambitious. In Chinese culture, these mythical creatures are in a class of their own, regarded as the givers of abundance and longevity.

Dragon’s confidence is neither false nor empty, as they hold lofty ideals they’re striving toward— usually for the benefit of their community instead of themselves. They are independent thinkers who’ll never yield their highest conviction.

Dragons are wise and adventurous and, at times, temperamental and impulsive. They’ll be loved and admired by many but find it difficult to return such affection. This will be one of Dragon’s most important lessons.

Wood Dragons very popular and move in different social circles, but because of their fiery temper, Wood Dragons may not be as lucky or auspicious in their intimate relationships. . They are blessed with the ability to make good use of their environment and have an intuitive sense of timing. 

If you were born in January or February, pay special attention to when the Lunar New Year (or Chinese New Year) begins since you may be the previous year’s animal!

Have a very happy, healthy and successful year of the dragon!

Sunday Class December Update

This month we were looking at winter landscapes specifically those by artists Kang Kai and Mao Binzhi

Mao Binzhi

Kang Kai

The key thing to remember is everything is reversed – sky and water dark – land light. Kang Kai’s work was very different from what we have looked at before. He paints his landscape and then adds white paint for his snow. Northern School Xeiyi normally just leave blank paper for snow. The effect is very different.

Jean Gray

Sarah Turner

Malcolm Gowlett

Marion Dearlove

Rose Meach

Rose Meach

Sunday Class Update November

This month we were looking at large birds, specially eagles and cranes By artists including Li Kuchan and Xu Gu.

Li Kuchan

Xu Gu

The works were in a mixture of lei gu and mo gu styles in both ink and colour. They were fun to work with and required good brush loading and good control.

Ana Lau

Bianca Deegan

Karen Gowlett

Malcolm Gowlett

Rose Meech

Sarah Turner

Marion Dearlove

Sunday Group update October

This month we were looking at lei gu (outline) figure painting  by artist including Ren Bonian and Yang Shoutao.

Yang Shoutao

Ren Bonian

It was more difficult than people assumed it would be and we have fewer examples to show you

Sarah Turner

Virgina Hayes

Marion Dearlove

Sunday Group update – September

This month we were looking at fish working with examples from a number of
artists including James Tan and Lu Qingyuan. We haven’t painted fish for a
very long time. It was fun to try again.

James Tan

Lu Qingyuan

The results were interesting:

Sarah Turner

Virgina Hayes

Virgina Hayes

Karen Gowlett

Malcolm Gowlett

Marion Dearlove

Rose Meech

Jean Gray

Sunday Group update – August

This month we were looking at small birds, specially the work of an artists we had not worked with before – Yu Chunglin (1925-1985). We were suing his fan paintings as examples.

Yu Chunglin

He made wide use of over painting – so, it was necessary to work slowly and carefully allowing each layer to dry before the next one was added. This technique generates a very 3 dimensional effect on the birds.

The results were very pleasing:

Sarah Turner – yellow throated bunting

Virgina Hayes – bunting

Karen Gowlett – swallows

Malcolm Gowlett – sparrows

Marion Dearlove – Hoopoe

Jean Gray – Snow Birds

Sunday Group update – July

This month we were looking at horses using examples from a number of artists including Au Honien, Xu Beihong and Zhen Shanping.

Au Honien

Xu Beihong

Zhen Shanping

The horses were mainly lei gu style both Xeiyi and Lingnan.

Should be fun to work with. The results are below:

Karen Gowlett

Malcolm Gowlett

Sarah Turner

Jean Gray

Virgina Hayes

Marion Dearlove

Rose Meech